Loxley

What happens next in the Loxley valley planning inquiry

What happens next in the Loxley valley planning inquiry

The planning inquiry into the proposed redevelopment of the old Loxley valley factories begins its second week of hearing evidence today, Monday April 19th.

This post briefly summarises what has happened so far. We summarise what the appeal hearing is all about. We also explain what is due to happen this week and later. And we explain why it will take some time before the Inspector’s decision is known.

What has happened so far?

In the first week of the inquiry, the parties presented their opening statements. Concerned members of the public were able to state their views for and against the scheme.

And the Planning Inspector chaired ‘Round Table’ discussions to assess whether Sheffield has a five-year supply of housing land, what the ‘landscape and visual impact’ of the housing scheme would be, and what the consequences would be for ecology and biodiversity.

What is the inquiry trying to decide, and how are we involved?

The inquiry is considering an appeal by Patrick Properties Strategic Land. They are contesting Sheffield City Council’s refusal of outline planning permission for a new township of up to 300 homes on the site of the old ‘Hepworth’ refractory works.

Sheffield City Council is defending its decision. The council says the refusal was made for valid planning reasons.

We and CPRE Peak District and South Yorkshire are taking part in the proceedings as a fully involved ‘Rule 6 party’. This is thanks to your generous contributions to our planning appeal fighting fund.

This means we are putting our own evidence to the inquiry. And we can question the witnesses who appear on behalf of Patrick Properties.

What is the timetable for the rest of the inquiry?

The inquiry hearing was due to resume at 2pm on Monday, April 19th.

It is then due to take evidence on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday. Then it is due to adjourn until at least another two days of evidence in early June.

The long break is because some witnesses and legal representatives are not available in the final week of April.

Once the hearing has finished, the Planning Inspector may take some time to consider his verdict. The outcome may not be known until later in the summer.

What is due to happen this week?

Today our transport witness Anne Robinson will take part in a ‘Round Table’ discussion on the accessibility of the site.

She will give detailed evidence on why the new development would be too remote from everyday amenities. She will say it lacks viable walking or cycling routes, and has poor public transport links.

There will then be further ‘Round Table’ discussions this week on housing need and land supply, and on contamination on the site.

Later this week, the inquiry is due to hear detailed examination and cross examination of the main planning witnesses.

Our planning consultant Andrew Wood is due to give his detailed evidence on Wednesday.

You can follow the inquiry via a video livestream on the Planning Inspectorate YouTube channel. This link will connect you to it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GdI5_pTGyI

We have decided to refrain from detailed opinion or commentary while the proceedings are active.  

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A new township is the wrong solution for the Loxley valley – our case to the planning inquiry

A new township is the wrong solution for the Loxley valley – our case to the planning inquiry

Building new suburbia in the heart of the Loxley valley will create an isolated, car-dependent township, remote from local amenities and damaging to Sheffield’s precious Green Belt countryside.

That’s the message that Friends of the Loxley Valley and CPRE Peak District and South Yorkshire will spell out to a planning inquiry starting on Tuesday April 13th.

We’re making our case alongside Sheffield City Council. They are defending their refusal of outline planning permission for up to 300 homes on the old ‘Hepworth’ factories site.

Developers Patrick Properties have appealed against the refusal.

Planning Inspector Martin Whitehead will oversee the inquiry hearing. He must decide whether to allow the appeal.

The inquiry is expected to last for up to ten days. It will take place ‘virtually’, via Microsoft Teams online conferencing.

The inquiry proceedings will also be livestreamed each day. You can access this via the Planning Inspectorate YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQqDetL1R5aRgbNm8PDViNw

Thank you for supporting our ‘Save Loxley Valley’ fighting fund

Friends of the Loxley Valley and CPRE are taking part in the inquiry as a main party. This is thanks to hundreds of financial donations from the local community.

Our ‘GoFundMe’ online crowd funder has now reached over £14,000 thanks to your remarkable generosity.

The money raised means we’ve been able to pay planning and transport experts to prepare a detailed case.

We have also instructed specialist planning barrister Alistair Mills of Landmark Chambers. Alistair will help to present our case, and to cross examine Patrick Properties’ planning witnesses.

He will work alongside our ‘appeal manager’, CPRE staff member Andy Tickle. Andy will attend the inquiry throughout.

Thank you again for the amazing donations that have made all this possible! If you can still afford to donate, or to spread the word to other potential supporters, we would really appreciate it.

We are still a little way short of our £15,000 GoFundMe target. We would like to go a little bit higher than the target if we can. This will help us to cover all our costs.

All donations at this stage will be very gratefully received. Every last fiver will help! Thank you so much!

What is the Friends of the Loxley Valley case?

Friends of the Loxley Valley and CPRE will argue that the heart of the Loxley valley is the wrong place to build a huge new housing estate.

Planning consultant Andrew Wood has prepared our main ‘Proof of Evidence’. He will tell the inquiry that the proposed township would have much greater impact on Green Belt countryside than the old factory sheds.

Andrew will say the development would extend suburban Sheffield to the edge of the Peak District National Park.

He will say this would dominate the valley bottom, and introduce round-the-clock human activity to a peaceful stretch of riverside.

This would break both national and local planning policies by building new housing in an unsustainable location when better sites are available.

CPRE Peak District and South Yorkshire transport adviser Anne Robinson has produced a separate ‘Proof of Evidence’ dealing with transport and accessibility.

She will tell the inquiry that local services would be inaccessible to people living in the new township.

She will say that walking, cycling or using public transport to reach schools, shops and other local amenities would be fraught with difficulty.

For example, there would be no direct bus service to Stannington, and Spout Lane is too long, steep and unsafe for most people to walk or cycle up it.

Anne will say that most people would have no realistic alternative to using the private car for all their essential local journeys.

What will Sheffield City Council tell the inquiry?

Sheffield City Council will tell the Planning Inspector that they were correct to refuse planning permission.

Their experts will say the development would breach planning policies, damage the Green Belt, and could cause irreversible biodiversity harm to the “ecological gem” that is the Loxley valley.

You can read the council’s case, plus all the documentation from the appellants Patrick Properties, on the planning inquiry website here: https://avison-young.foleon.com/uk-loxley-inquiry/loxley-inquiry/home/

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Sheffield city councillors vote to protect Loxley valley trees

Sheffield city councillors vote to protect Loxley valley trees

Sheffield city councillors have voted unanimously to protect trees growing on the former Hepworth factory site in the Loxley valley.

The council’s Planning Committee confirmed a Tree Preservation Order (TPO) covering a half-mile stretch of the valley bottom.

The TPO will also protect historic trees growing alongside Storrs Bridge Lane. This is the road that drops down to the old refractory works from Loxley Road.

Many of the trees in the valley bottom have grown alongside the abandoned old factory buildings.

The buildings have mainly stood empty since production of refractory bricks ended in the 1990s.

The city council recently refused planning permission for a township of up to 300 homes on the site.

But Patrick Properties Strategic Land, who own the site, have appealed against the decision.

Their appeal will be heard at a planning inquiry in April that is expected to last ten days.

Why did the council decide to issue the TPO?

Council officer Jack Foxall presented a report to today’s Planning Committee setting out why the TPO was necessary.

He said the trees were of significant local amenity value and suitable for protection.

And he said they were now under possible threat from potential future development.

His report said protection of the trees would “benefit the visual amenity of the local environment”.

Mr Foxall told the committee that Patrick Properties had objected to the TPO, but they had missed the closing date for representations.

Nonetheless, the council had considered the objection and had concluded the TPO was “fully justified”.

Councillors voted unanimously to accept the officer’s report and to confirm the TPO.

It applies to trees growing alongside the River Loxley through the factories, on the banks of Loxley Old Wheel dam and head goyt, on Storrs Bridge Lane, and near to some of the old buildings.

How will the future of the old factories be decided?  

As we said above, Patrick Properties are appealing against the city council’s refusal of planning permission.

They will now present their evidence to a government Planning Inspector, who will decide whether to approve the appeal.

He will hold a hearing in April that is expected to last ten days.

Sheffield City Council will contest the appeal. Friends of the Loxley Valley are also taking part in the inquiry alongside campaign partners CPRE Peak District and South Yorkshire.

This means we will present our own evidence, and can question the evidence submitted by the developers.

But it also means we need to pay for planning experts and professional help to prepare our case and to present it effectively.

Will you help us to build our fighting fund?

We and our CPRE partners have launched a Save Loxley Valley fighting fund to raise the money we need to fight the appeal.

We are hoping to raise at least £15,000. We have set up a crowdfunding link for donations.

We know that this is a really difficult time for everyone in our community, but please donate to the fighting fund if you can afford it. Every donation WILL help us to make our case.

 

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‘Why have Sheffield City Council sent me a Loxley valley planning letter?’

‘Why have Sheffield City Council sent me a Loxley valley planning letter?’

‘Why did Sheffield City Council sent me a Loxley valley planning letter just before Christmas?’

It’s a good question, and one that many people around the Loxley valley will have been asking as this official letter arrived with the Christmas cards at the end of last year.

So we’ve posted this web page to try to explain, and to provide some guidance on how you might want to respond.

Patrick Properties have appealed against the council’s refusal of planning permission

Sheffield City Council refused planning permission for a township of up to 300 homes on the old ‘Hepworth’ brickworks site in the Loxley valley.

The developers, Patrick Properties Strategic Land, are appealing against that decision.

They hope to persuade a Planning Inspector that the council got it wrong, and that the decision should be overturned.

They will present their case to a public planning inquiry starting on Monday, April 12th. It is likely to last for ten days.

The council will fight the appeal. They will present their own evidence, arguing they applied planning policies correctly. They want the refusal to stand.

Friends of the Loxley Valley intend to support the council. We hope to present our own evidence too. We think a huge unsustainable housing scheme would be disastrous for the Loxley valley.

So, back to the question: ‘Why have I got this letter?’

You will have received the letter if you made your views known to the council before the original planning decision.

Over 900 local people and organisations objected to the planning application and wrote to the Sheffield planners to air their concerns.

The council has written to you now so that YOUR views can be made known to the planning inquiry if you want this to happen.

You can do this in two ways.

Firstly, if you are happy with your original objection, you do not need to do anything. The council will pass your objection on to the Planning Inspector. He will read it, and he will take it into account with all the other evidence.

Can I make additional points to the Planning Inspector?

Yes. If you want to add to your original objection, you can do that too. This is the second way of making your views known.

We have drafted a guidance note to explain how you can do that, and how to make sure your views are taken into account.

But you must now act quickly! The deadline for representations is Wednesday, January 20th.

You may also want to read the detailed Statement of Case that forms the basis of the appeal by Patrick Properties. We think many of their arguments are weak, and we intend to challenge them at the inquiry.

You can download both documents here:

Can I make my views known if I didn’t object to the original planning application?

Yes! Everybody has the democratic right to make their views known to the Planning Inspector.

It is not too late to set out your concerns. A huge housing development would affect all our lives locally, for example through the impact on local roads and services.

If you are worried about this, you have the right to make your case heard.

But if you do write, try to set down evidence to support your fears. For example, if you feel Loxley Road is already carrying too much traffic, set out your experiences and concerns.

Please see our guidance link in the previous section of this post.

Please help us by donating to our Fighting Fund now

Friends of the Loxley Valley is run entirely by community volunteers. We’re happy to provide the guidance and information on this website free of charge.

But we will need expert professional help so that we can present strong evidence at the planning inquiry.

We need to raise thousands of pounds so that we can pay for professional planning experts. They will help us to prepare and present our case.

The more we can raise; the stronger we hope our case will be. And the more we raise, the more professional expertise and representation we can secure.

We and our campaign partners CPRE Peak District and South Yorkshire have set up a fighting fund appeal to raise the money.

Thank you! We know how hard everyone’s finances are pushed at the moment. But every donation, however small, will really help us on our way!

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Friends of the Loxley Valley launch planning appeal fighting fund

Friends of the Loxley Valley launch planning appeal fighting fund

Friends of the Loxley Valley have launched a fundraising drive to fight plans for the Loxley valley township.

Our ‘Save Loxley valley’ fighting fund is being run jointly with our campaign partners CPRE Peak District and South Yorkshire.

We are appealing for donations to help us ensure local concerns are voiced effectively at a planning inquiry hearing later this year.

If you’d like to donate, you can give money NOW using the online site GoFundMe:

Why do we need the money?

The fighting fund will help us to prepare for a public planning inquiry later this year.

Developers Patrick Properties have appealed against Sheffield City Council’s refusal of planning permission.

They want to build up to 300 homes on the redundant Hepworth refractory works at the valley’s heart..

A Planning Inspector will hear their case at an inquiry beginning on Monday 12th April.

The hearing is likely to be held online, and will last for an estimated ten days.

Sheffield City Council are fighting the appeal, arguing there were good grounds for refusing planning permission.

We support the council, but we also want the Planning Inspector to be in no doubt about how strongly local people feel.

What will the money pay for?

Your donations will help us to pay for professional planning experts and possibly legal representation to help us to fight our case.

And the more you give, the greater our chances of winning and defending the city’s democratic decision!

We believe that the Loxley valley deserves a better solution than unsustainable mass housing.

Even a small donation will help us on our way. Every single pound donated WILL make a difference and will help us to save the Loxley valley from urban sprawl.

How to donate

This link will take you to the GoFundMe account where you can donate money now 

You can donate using a PayPal account, or by using a debit or credit card.

The fighting fund money is being held in a secure ring-fenced charity bank account by our campaign partners CPRE Peak District and South Yorkshire.

If you are a taxpayer, please tick the ‘Gift Aid’ box when you make your donation. This means the charity can claim an extra 25p for every £1 you give.

It won’t cost you any extra, but it will help your money to go further and to work harder!

If you would prefer to donate by cheque, please make your cheque payable to CPRE PDSY. Please write ‘Loxley valley appeal’ on the back of the cheque, and send it to the following address:

CPRE PDSY,
Victoria Hall,
37 Stafford Road.
Sheffield,
S2 2SF.

Thank you so much for your support!

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Sheffield City Council issues clean-up orders to Loxley valley landowners

Sheffield City Council issues clean-up orders to Loxley valley landowners

Sheffield City Council has ordered the owners of the old Hepworth refractory works in the Loxley valley to clear illegally dumped waste and to keep vermin under control.

The council’s Environmental Protection Service has posted ‘Enviro-crime scene’ notices at the factory entrance on Storrs Bridge Lane.

The notices are dated Tuesday, 27th October. They tell the landowners they have 42 days from then to clear the waste.

Then they must then inspect the site once a month to keep it waste-free.

The landowners must also remove materials that could provide ‘harbourage or food’ for rats and mice.

The council served the notices on Patrick Properties, who own the old factories, and on the owners of the adjacent Claremont House.

Claremont House is the semi-derelict detached house that was formerly the social club for factory workers.

The council’s actions follow repeated waste dumping on the sites.

The notices list the following items of waste:

  • Electrical and white goods
  • Wood
  • Metal
  • Construction/demolition waste
  • Glass
  • Food waste
  • General household and commercial waste

The council warns the landowners they could face fines of up to £5,000 if they fail to comply with the notices.

 

Some of the waste that has accumulated on the site in the Loxley valley
Some of the waste that has accumulated on the site in the Loxley valley

The notices that have been served on Patrick Properties in the Loxley valley
The notices that have been served on Patrick Properties in the Loxley valley

The notices that have been served on the Claremont House owners in the Loxley valley
The notices that have been served on the Claremont House owners in the Loxley valley
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Countryside charity CPRE South Yorkshire condemns plans for Loxley valley township

Countryside charity CPRE South Yorkshire condemns plans for Loxley valley township

Our campaign partners CPRE South Yorkshire have posted a scathing objection to plans for a new township of 300 homes in the heart of the Loxley valley.

They say the township proposed by developers Patrick Properties would damage Sheffield’s precious Green Belt countryside.

And they warn it would transform the beauty and openness of a much-loved valley on the edge of the Peak District National Park.

The developers claim the new township on the site of long-abandoned old factories would create a ‘sustainable’ new settlement.

But the CPRE dismiss this claim as ‘laughable’. They say it would be remote from the local services needed by hundreds of new residents.

They say it would swamp local roads with extra cars. This would add to congestion and air pollution at a time of climate emergency.

The CPRE urge Sheffield councillors to throw the plans out

The comments from CPRE South Yorkshire are contained in a detailed objection to the Sheffield City Council planning department.

The council’s planning committee must decide whether to approve the planning application. CPRE South Yorkshire say it should be thrown out.

Their main points are as follows:

  • The township would encroach on open countryside and would breach both local and national Green Belt policies
  • It would be remote, isolated and unsustainable, pushing up dependence on car journeys at a time of climate emergency
  • The site is not designated for housing and is not needed for housing, as Sheffield is now building enough houses elsewhere
  • It would do little to meet local demand for affordable housing
  • The township would urbanise a quiet site on the edge of the Peak District National Park and would damage nature conservation and biodiversity

The CPRE also say the plans are far too vague, as the developers are seeking only ‘outline’ planning permission.

They warn the developers would then sell the land to housebuilders, who would not be tied to detailed planning approval.

Who are CPRE South Yorkshire?

CPRE South Yorkshire are the local branch of the Campaign to Protect Rural England, otherwise known as the ‘countryside charity’.

Their aim is to make the countryside a better place for everyone to live, work and enjoy.

CPRE South Yorkshire have a sister organisation, Friends of the Peak District, who work to safeguard Britain’s first national park.

The Peak District is of course on our doorstep here in the Loxley valley!

We have worked closely with CPRE South Yorkshire and Friends of the Peak District for many years.

Our joint goal is to celebrate and safeguard our beautiful valley and to protect it from damaging development.

The CPRE is an independent charity. It has a small team in Sheffield who are all experienced and passionate experts on the city’s countryside.

If you share our joint goals, we would urge you to support the charity in its work.

You can make a very real difference by making a modest donation. Or perhaps you might like to become a member?

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Friends of the Loxley Valley deliver thousands of ‘No Township!’ leaflets

Friends of the Loxley Valley deliver thousands of ‘No Township!’ leaflets

Friends of the Loxley Valley have printed thousands of leaflets to let people know that there is now more time to comment on plans for a new township in the heart of the valley.

Our members are now delivering the leaflets to every home and business in the valley, and to neighbouring areas like Hillsborough and Walkley.

The leaflets give guidance on how to make your views known to the Sheffield City Council planning committee.

They explain why there is more time to comment – the official statutory consultation period now ends on July 30th.

And they summarise progress in the #NoLoxleyTownship campaign so far.

Nearly 800 individuals and organisations have objected at the time of writing this post.

They include the Peak District National Park Authority, the Campaign to Protect Rural England, the Rivelin Valley Conservation Group, plus our two MPs and local councillors.

The leaflet is also available electronically. It includes links that you can use to make comments to the planners.

You can download it here. Please feel free to share it widely if you know people further afield who might help with our campaign.

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Deadline for township comments is extended AGAIN to 30th July

Deadline for township comments is extended AGAIN to 30th July

STOP PRESS: The planning department has now completed a new set of site notices around the Loxley valley. So far as we can tell, they have updated them ALL with the date when the last notice was posted.

The photograph above shows one of the new notices at Rowell Bridge. It’s slightly smeared by the rain, but you can see that the new date of posting is 30th June.

This replaces the notice posted a little earlier on 24th June, (see our last news post).

The notice wording makes it clear: you now have 30 days from 30th June to submit comments on the proposed new Loxley valley township.

So if we’ve calculated correctly the NEW new deadline is now Thursday 30th July.

The planning application for the old refractory works would mark a huge change for life in the Loxley valley. If you have not yet commented, we would urge you to do so.

For details on HOW to do this, and WHY we think the new notices have gone up, please see our previous news post.

Do you want to know more about the planning application?

Developers Patrick Properties have proposed a township of up to 300 homes. We have summarised their plans, and our concerns, in an earlier news post on this website. You can also view the full planning application, and all associated documentation, on the Sheffield City Council website. The reference number for the planning application is 20/01301/OUT

Would you like to make your views known to the planners?

If you feel ready to make your views known to the planners, you can do so by posting a comment on the council’s website.

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Rivelin Valley Conservation Group urges planners to reject the Loxley valley township

Rivelin Valley Conservation Group urges planners to reject the Loxley valley township

Our sister organisation in the Rivelin valley has condemned plans to build a township of up to 300 homes in the Loxley valley, and has urged city planners to reject them.

The Rivelin Valley Conservation Group (RVCG) has submitted a detailed objection setting out numerous breaches of national and local planning policies.

RVCG says the proposal for a huge housing estate on old factory sites below Damflask would seriously harm Sheffield’s Green Belt.

It says the site would be conspicuous from the Peak District National Park and would damage the appearance and character of local countryside.

The RVCG also warn of increased traffic congestion, underused public transport and an unsustainable load on local services.

RVCG summarise their main concerns as follows:

  • The development breaches the National Planning Policy Framework and Sheffield’s statutory development plan policies, particularly in respect of development in the Green Belt, Area of High Landscape Value and Area of Special Character, and impact on the neighbouring Peak District National Park.
  • Very special circumstances in respect of an immediate and urgent need to remove dereliction from the site or to release the land for housing have not been demonstrated.
  • The application site is in an unsustainable location because:
    • Of its transport and travel impacts, particularly in respect of car use for work and other travel needs and the inevitable increase in traffic congestion and pollution in the Malin Bridge and Hillsborough areas.
    • The impact on existing services and facilities which would not be provided in a development of this size e.g. adequate bus services,  school, medical and other community-based facilities and shops.
    • The adverse impact on the environment and informal rural recreation, including nature conservation, and the attractive and important rural character of the local and wider landscape of the Loxley valley.
  • The release of the site for housing would breach numerous local planning policies and would prejudice the city’s ability to protect the Green Belt in future policies.

You still have time to post your own objection

We are urging Sheffield City Council to extend the deadline for objections to the planning application.

This is because the applicant submitted numerous weighty documents towards the end of the consultation period.

We think people need time to read and assess these documents and have the opportunity to comment on them.

We think the planning application should not have been ‘validated’ and made public until all the legally required documentation was complete.

In the meantime, the city council’s ‘planning portal’ is still accepting comments.

If you have not yet made your views known, we would urge you to do so. The planning application reference number is 20/01301/OUT

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